Coaching our Client to a Promotion, Unexpectedly

Recently we arrived at the office of a client to prepare her for an upcoming speech at a national sales convention. She is a regular client who has worked with us on many presentations over the last three years. We’ve developed a very good working relationship, and we were confident about how the session would go — we’d go through the deck, tweak the language and slides, then polish her presentation. This is the usual flow for our voice and presentation coaching.

But when we arrived our client was in an emotional turmoil because she found out that she may have been passed over for a promotion to VP. What we thought would be a good rehearsal turned out to be both an emotional roller coaster to navigate and a strategy session for making her case. First step, allowing her to vent and get her emotions out of the way. Then, we used a set of visual imagination techniques to get her clear on what she really wanted amidst the tight deadlines and the emotional stress.  

From there, we engaged in a  strategy session to help her prepare for her meeting that hour (!) with the human resources representative  to discuss her job status  We wanted her to understand that the HR person, while friendly with her, was not her confidante or best advocate. That meant: listen, stay calm, and let it be known that you are the best candidate for the VP position.

We left her that day knowing that she felt less hurt and more confident, which gave her courage and fortitude to face this difficult interaction. We had no idea what the outcome would be but we knew we’d coached her through her moment of crisis to a place where she was able to own her accomplishments and ask confidently for the promotion she’d worked long and hard to achieve.

The next week we heard from our client that she’d met with the CEO and team and, as she expressed it, “got her stripes.” She thanked us for our real-time “multifaceted assistance” towards getting her VP promotion. As coaches we have to be ready for anything, but it’s key to build a strong foundation with clients so that when the unexpected occurs we have the tools and rapport to have an impact no matter what circumstances we walk into. 

Voice & Presentation Coach Marilyn Pittman and Executive Producer Marianne Wilman were the coaches at this session      

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Recently we arrived at the office of a client to prepare her for an upcoming speech at a national sales convention. She is a regular client who has worked with us on many presentations over the last three years. We’ve developed a very good working relationship, and we were confident about how the session would go — we’d go through the deck, tweak the language and slides, then polish her presentation. This is the usual flow for our voice and presentation coaching.

But when we arrived our client was in an emotional turmoil because she found out that she may have been passed over for a promotion to VP. What we thought would be a good rehearsal turned out to be both an emotional roller coaster to navigate and a strategy session for making her case. First step, allowing her to vent and get her emotions out of the way. Then, we used a set of visual imagination techniques to get her clear on what she really wanted amidst the tight deadlines and the emotional stress.  

From there, we engaged in a  strategy session to help her prepare for her meeting that hour (!) with the human resources representative  to discuss her job status  We wanted her to understand that the HR person, while friendly with her, was not her confidante or best advocate. That meant: listen, stay calm, and let it be known that you are the best candidate for the VP position.

We left her that day knowing that she felt less hurt and more confident, which gave her courage and fortitude to face this difficult interaction. We had no idea what the outcome would be but we knew we’d coached her through her moment of crisis to a place where she was able to own her accomplishments and ask confidently for the promotion she’d worked long and hard to achieve.

The next week we heard from our client that she’d met with the CEO and team and, as she expressed it, “got her stripes.” She thanked us for our real-time “multifaceted assistance” towards getting her VP promotion. As coaches we have to be ready for anything, but it’s key to build a strong foundation with clients so that when the unexpected occurs we have the tools and rapport to have an impact no matter what circumstances we walk into. 

Voice & Presentation Coach Marilyn Pittman and Executive Producer Marianne Wilman were the coaches at this session      

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail
On-Camera Makeup for Women: Why Less Is More

With cameras and TV studios mostly shooting in HD (high definition), the heavy, theatrical makeup often used for TV appearances in the past is no longer appropriate. HD exposes far more detail than standard definition cameras, which means that makeup texture shows up on screen if not applied carefully.

Here’s how to present a more natural look for your HD camera appearance:

  • Avoid a caked-on look by using a finely milled translucent powder, such as Make Up For Ever.
  • It’s easy to look pale with HD cameras. A slightly darker shade of foundation will help you look less washed out. Again, using a foundation made for HD will provide lighter coverage while still masking imperfections.
  • Be sure to apply makeup to the neck area and blend well. You want to avoid a line around the bottom of the face where the makeup ends. A two-tone look for the face and neck is not what you’re going for!

Product and application matter a lot when it comes to HD, and it’s worth investing in an HD makeup kit if you’re going to be on-camera regularly. Many people will feel more confident with a makeup artist to help them prepare. Finally, if you’re not sure whether your appearance will be shot in HD or SD ask the producer. Your video appearance is likely to live on in easily searchable online archives, so make sure you’re showing up as your best on-camera self!

Screen Presence hair and makeup stylist Sarah Hyde provided the content for this post

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

With cameras and TV studios mostly shooting in HD (high definition), the heavy, theatrical makeup often used for TV appearances in the past is no longer appropriate. HD exposes far more detail than standard definition cameras, which means that makeup texture shows up on screen if not applied carefully.

Here’s how to present a more natural look for your HD camera appearance:

  • Avoid a caked-on look by using a finely milled translucent powder, such as Make Up For Ever.
  • It’s easy to look pale with HD cameras. A slightly darker shade of foundation will help you look less washed out. Again, using a foundation made for HD will provide lighter coverage while still masking imperfections.
  • Be sure to apply makeup to the neck area and blend well. You want to avoid a line around the bottom of the face where the makeup ends. A two-tone look for the face and neck is not what you’re going for!

Product and application matter a lot when it comes to HD, and it’s worth investing in an HD makeup kit if you’re going to be on-camera regularly. Many people will feel more confident with a makeup artist to help them prepare. Finally, if you’re not sure whether your appearance will be shot in HD or SD ask the producer. Your video appearance is likely to live on in easily searchable online archives, so make sure you’re showing up as your best on-camera self!

Screen Presence hair and makeup stylist Sarah Hyde provided the content for this post

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail
On-Camera Makeup Tips for the Eyes

The good news about applying eye makeup for your on-camera appearance is that it doesn’t need to be very different from your everyday eye makeup. However, if you generally don’t wear eye makeup, be sure to apply some for the camera. Your eyes are an important part of how people see you through the lens. They help your face come to life.

Whether you prefer a more natural or a made-up look, the goal is to frame and define the eyes. Lining the eyes will bring out definition and make the eyes pop. Here are some guidelines for defining the lash line:

  • If your eyes are close set, add liner to the outer edge to make them appear wider. If your eyes are far set — defined as the space between your eyes being bigger than the length of one eye — add liner all the way to the inner corner.
  • Although liner can be challenging to apply, there are many eyelining pens that can make the job easier. Thinner lines along the lash make for a natural look; a stronger lash line will really frame the eye. In both cases add a dark brown or black mascara to finish the look.
  • If you really can’t deal with liner, cheat by adding a dark eyeshadow along the lash line.

Other eye makeup tips:

  • Avoid make up that glimmers. Neutral colors and matte finishes will work best to draw the viewer in rather than reflecting light and attention away from the eyes.
  • Use a primer or base to prevent makeup from smudging under the heat of the camera lights.
  • Remember the basic color rules: lighter colors will make your eyes look bigger, darker colors will be more intense.
  • Finally, have eye drops to hand to remove any red eye on shoot day.

Screen Presence hair and makeup stylist Sarah Hyde provided the content for this post.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

The good news about applying eye makeup for your on-camera appearance is that it doesn’t need to be very different from your everyday eye makeup. However, if you generally don’t wear eye makeup, be sure to apply some for the camera. Your eyes are an important part of how people see you through the lens. They help your face come to life.

Whether you prefer a more natural or a made-up look, the goal is to frame and define the eyes. Lining the eyes will bring out definition and make the eyes pop. Here are some guidelines for defining the lash line:

  • If your eyes are close set, add liner to the outer edge to make them appear wider. If your eyes are far set — defined as the space between your eyes being bigger than the length of one eye — add liner all the way to the inner corner.
  • Although liner can be challenging to apply, there are many eyelining pens that can make the job easier. Thinner lines along the lash make for a natural look; a stronger lash line will really frame the eye. In both cases add a dark brown or black mascara to finish the look.
  • If you really can’t deal with liner, cheat by adding a dark eyeshadow along the lash line.

Other eye makeup tips:

  • Avoid make up that glimmers. Neutral colors and matte finishes will work best to draw the viewer in rather than reflecting light and attention away from the eyes.
  • Use a primer or base to prevent makeup from smudging under the heat of the camera lights.
  • Remember the basic color rules: lighter colors will make your eyes look bigger, darker colors will be more intense.
  • Finally, have eye drops to hand to remove any red eye on shoot day.

Screen Presence hair and makeup stylist Sarah Hyde provided the content for this post.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail
On-Camera Hair Tips for Women

Up or down? Straight or curly? Around the face or away from the face? Women and their hair is a tricky business without the added pressure of the camera. The heat of the camera lights affects our locks, so it’s likely that your hair will become either flatter, more frizzy or flyaway, depending on your hair type.

How you style your hair depends on your face shape and your hair texture but here are some rules of thumb for your screen presence:

  • Flyaway hairs that pick up light are what professional hair people spend most of their time cleaning up by using styling cream to keep them in place. But beware of using too much product, which can make the hair look flat. Frizzy hair is a common problem too. Applying a styling cream or serum will help it from looking dry and unattractive.
  • Thin, stringy hair and in particular loose bangs do not usually look flattering on camera. If you have thin hair, it will look better clean and either short or possibly up.
  • Products, like Toppik, can help conceal thin spots, but you may also consider hair extensions or even wigs. These are a fun option, and you’d be surprised at how many people wear them!
  • For many women, the easiest approach, if you can make the time, is to go for a professional blow out. This will create luster and fullness. Make an appointment for close to your on-camera time so that it holds.

Given all the things there are to think about as you gear up for an on-camera appearance, you don’t want to be distracted and preoccupied by your hair. Figuring out in advance a style that creates a finished look will provide you with confidence and enable you to focus on what matters most — what you’re going to say.

Screen Presence hair and makeup stylist Sarah Hyde provided the content for this post

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Up or down? Straight or curly? Around the face or away from the face? Women and their hair is a tricky business without the added pressure of the camera. The heat of the camera lights affects our locks, so it’s likely that your hair will become either flatter, more frizzy or flyaway, depending on your hair type.

How you style your hair depends on your face shape and your hair texture but here are some rules of thumb for your screen presence:

  • Flyaway hairs that pick up light are what professional hair people spend most of their time cleaning up by using styling cream to keep them in place. But beware of using too much product, which can make the hair look flat. Frizzy hair is a common problem too. Applying a styling cream or serum will help it from looking dry and unattractive.
  • Thin, stringy hair and in particular loose bangs do not usually look flattering on camera. If you have thin hair, it will look better clean and either short or possibly up.
  • Products, like Toppik, can help conceal thin spots, but you may also consider hair extensions or even wigs. These are a fun option, and you’d be surprised at how many people wear them!
  • For many women, the easiest approach, if you can make the time, is to go for a professional blow out. This will create luster and fullness. Make an appointment for close to your on-camera time so that it holds.

Given all the things there are to think about as you gear up for an on-camera appearance, you don’t want to be distracted and preoccupied by your hair. Figuring out in advance a style that creates a finished look will provide you with confidence and enable you to focus on what matters most — what you’re going to say.

Screen Presence hair and makeup stylist Sarah Hyde provided the content for this post

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail
How Women Can Get Ahead By Developing an Authoritative Voice

Women don’t have the deeper resonance in their voices that men do, so they are often challenged to be heard and respected in the way they want or deserve. Understanding your vocal presence and how to control and use it to get your message across is vital to being an effective speaker.

Here are some tips for developing a more powerful and persuasive voice:

  • Learn to breathe from the diaphragm so you have some air in the sound. Exhaling more air through the vocal cords with the help of the diaphragmatic muscles will give your voice more depth, volume, and power.
  • Develop your ability to evaluate your voice by recording it (surreptitiously!) in presentations and then evaluating its strengths and weaknesses. Is it too high? Too nasal? Too fast or slow?  Work on one of these each time you present.
  • Once you’ve found your best pitch and rhythm, learn how to get yourself back to that best vocal place each time before you speak.  For many women this will involve finding a lower range than your usual speaking voice. There are many exercises that can help.

It’s easy to neglect how we sound, taking our voices as a given.  But, spending the time to develop your voice and turning it into a more powerful attribute can be a valuable and underestimated asset in a woman’s career.

Screen Presence Voice Coach Marilyn Pittman provided the information for this post.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Women don’t have the deeper resonance in their voices that men do, so they are often challenged to be heard and respected in the way they want or deserve. Understanding your vocal presence and how to control and use it to get your message across is vital to being an effective speaker.

Here are some tips for developing a more powerful and persuasive voice:

  • Learn to breathe from the diaphragm so you have some air in the sound. Exhaling more air through the vocal cords with the help of the diaphragmatic muscles will give your voice more depth, volume, and power.
  • Develop your ability to evaluate your voice by recording it (surreptitiously!) in presentations and then evaluating its strengths and weaknesses. Is it too high? Too nasal? Too fast or slow?  Work on one of these each time you present.
  • Once you’ve found your best pitch and rhythm, learn how to get yourself back to that best vocal place each time before you speak.  For many women this will involve finding a lower range than your usual speaking voice. There are many exercises that can help.

It’s easy to neglect how we sound, taking our voices as a given.  But, spending the time to develop your voice and turning it into a more powerful attribute can be a valuable and underestimated asset in a woman’s career.

Screen Presence Voice Coach Marilyn Pittman provided the information for this post.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail