Coaching our Client to a Promotion, Unexpectedly

Recently we arrived at the office of a client to prepare her for an upcoming speech at a national sales convention. She is a regular client who has worked with us on many presentations over the last three years. We’ve developed a very good working relationship, and we were confident about how the session would go — we’d go through the deck, tweak the language and slides, then polish her presentation. This is the usual flow for our voice and presentation coaching.

But when we arrived our client was in an emotional turmoil because she found out that she may have been passed over for a promotion to VP. What we thought would be a good rehearsal turned out to be both an emotional roller coaster to navigate and a strategy session for making her case. First step, allowing her to vent and get her emotions out of the way. Then, we used a set of visual imagination techniques to get her clear on what she really wanted amidst the tight deadlines and the emotional stress.  

From there, we engaged in a  strategy session to help her prepare for her meeting that hour (!) with the human resources representative  to discuss her job status  We wanted her to understand that the HR person, while friendly with her, was not her confidante or best advocate. That meant: listen, stay calm, and let it be known that you are the best candidate for the VP position.

We left her that day knowing that she felt less hurt and more confident, which gave her courage and fortitude to face this difficult interaction. We had no idea what the outcome would be but we knew we’d coached her through her moment of crisis to a place where she was able to own her accomplishments and ask confidently for the promotion she’d worked long and hard to achieve.

The next week we heard from our client that she’d met with the CEO and team and, as she expressed it, “got her stripes.” She thanked us for our real-time “multifaceted assistance” towards getting her VP promotion. As coaches we have to be ready for anything, but it’s key to build a strong foundation with clients so that when the unexpected occurs we have the tools and rapport to have an impact no matter what circumstances we walk into. 

Voice & Presentation Coach Marilyn Pittman and Executive Producer Marianne Wilman were the coaches at this session      

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Recently we arrived at the office of a client to prepare her for an upcoming speech at a national sales convention. She is a regular client who has worked with us on many presentations over the last three years. We’ve developed a very good working relationship, and we were confident about how the session would go — we’d go through the deck, tweak the language and slides, then polish her presentation. This is the usual flow for our voice and presentation coaching.

But when we arrived our client was in an emotional turmoil because she found out that she may have been passed over for a promotion to VP. What we thought would be a good rehearsal turned out to be both an emotional roller coaster to navigate and a strategy session for making her case. First step, allowing her to vent and get her emotions out of the way. Then, we used a set of visual imagination techniques to get her clear on what she really wanted amidst the tight deadlines and the emotional stress.  

From there, we engaged in a  strategy session to help her prepare for her meeting that hour (!) with the human resources representative  to discuss her job status  We wanted her to understand that the HR person, while friendly with her, was not her confidante or best advocate. That meant: listen, stay calm, and let it be known that you are the best candidate for the VP position.

We left her that day knowing that she felt less hurt and more confident, which gave her courage and fortitude to face this difficult interaction. We had no idea what the outcome would be but we knew we’d coached her through her moment of crisis to a place where she was able to own her accomplishments and ask confidently for the promotion she’d worked long and hard to achieve.

The next week we heard from our client that she’d met with the CEO and team and, as she expressed it, “got her stripes.” She thanked us for our real-time “multifaceted assistance” towards getting her VP promotion. As coaches we have to be ready for anything, but it’s key to build a strong foundation with clients so that when the unexpected occurs we have the tools and rapport to have an impact no matter what circumstances we walk into. 

Voice & Presentation Coach Marilyn Pittman and Executive Producer Marianne Wilman were the coaches at this session      

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Client Story: Getting a Handle on the Saboteurs to Get a Promotion

I’m working as a career coach with a young client who is in his first job at a start up. He’s been feeling under-valued and under-appreciated and he’s been working longer and longer days, sometimes putting in as many as 19 hours per day. He’s the strongest individual contributor in his department, always the one management turns to in a crisis.

My client was promised a raise and given a timeline but then his manager left the company. He put his trust in his new manager but was feeling like nothing was happening. He feels competitive with his peers and over time his relationships at work have been taking a hit.

My client’s Saboteurs are very alive. One makes him feel betrayed, another causes him to create trouble by pushing too hard vocally, another makes him passive and unable to follow through.

During coaching we’ve identified and spent time getting to know the Saboteurs — the words they use, when they show up, what gets them going and the impact they have. And we’ve given each Saboteur a name so we now have a shorthand as they show up.

Over the last months my client has been getting more of a handle on his Saboteurs, they’re still present and at times forceful but they’re no longer in the driver’s seat. There’s now more room for his choices, and for smarter and more strategic decisions in the workplace.

During our latest session my client announced that he’d received a hard fought pay rise. He’s also now firmly on a path to a promotion with in-house mentoring and training.

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I’m working as a career coach with a young client who is in his first job at a start up. He’s been feeling under-valued and under-appreciated and he’s been working longer and longer days, sometimes putting in as many as 19 hours per day. He’s the strongest individual contributor in his department, always the one management turns to in a crisis.

My client was promised a raise and given a timeline but then his manager left the company. He put his trust in his new manager but was feeling like nothing was happening. He feels competitive with his peers and over time his relationships at work have been taking a hit.

My client’s Saboteurs are very alive. One makes him feel betrayed, another causes him to create trouble by pushing too hard vocally, another makes him passive and unable to follow through.

During coaching we’ve identified and spent time getting to know the Saboteurs — the words they use, when they show up, what gets them going and the impact they have. And we’ve given each Saboteur a name so we now have a shorthand as they show up.

Over the last months my client has been getting more of a handle on his Saboteurs, they’re still present and at times forceful but they’re no longer in the driver’s seat. There’s now more room for his choices, and for smarter and more strategic decisions in the workplace.

During our latest session my client announced that he’d received a hard fought pay rise. He’s also now firmly on a path to a promotion with in-house mentoring and training.

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