Facial Hair Tips for Men

Some men tend to show a 5 o’clock shadow well before 5pm. Others, particularly of a certain age, may have rogue eyebrows and nose hairs. In real life you may not pay much attention to these grooming details but on camera, especially in close up, they become more obvious and can be distracting to viewers.

Here’s the facial hair checklist for men:

  • When it comes to nose hairs use scissors or trimmers. Scissors with a slight curve are probably the best choice and can be picked up inexpensively at the drug store.
  • For bushy, long or sticking out eyebrows, scissors and a mustache comb can work. Comb them up and see which hairs are really long and just trim the long ones. The eyes are one of your most powerful communication tools so keep them clear.
  • Unless you’re going for the 5 o’clock shadow look, you’ll appear more polished by shaving close to shoot time. This might mean remembering to take a shaving kit into the office with you and finding a quiet bathroom.

If you prefer not to deal with extraneous facial hair, have your hair stylist or barber tend to mustache, eyebrows, nose and ears.

For character actors Einstein brows might be a signature look, and scientists will be welcomed into the TV studio with a grizzly beard, but for the everyday executive, business owner or entrepreneur a neatly trimmed look is the way to go for your next on-camera performance.

Screen Presence hair and makeup stylist Sarah Hyde provided the content for this post

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Some men tend to show a 5 o’clock shadow well before 5pm. Others, particularly of a certain age, may have rogue eyebrows and nose hairs. In real life you may not pay much attention to these grooming details but on camera, especially in close up, they become more obvious and can be distracting to viewers.

Here’s the facial hair checklist for men:

  • When it comes to nose hairs use scissors or trimmers. Scissors with a slight curve are probably the best choice and can be picked up inexpensively at the drug store.
  • For bushy, long or sticking out eyebrows, scissors and a mustache comb can work. Comb them up and see which hairs are really long and just trim the long ones. The eyes are one of your most powerful communication tools so keep them clear.
  • Unless you’re going for the 5 o’clock shadow look, you’ll appear more polished by shaving close to shoot time. This might mean remembering to take a shaving kit into the office with you and finding a quiet bathroom.

If you prefer not to deal with extraneous facial hair, have your hair stylist or barber tend to mustache, eyebrows, nose and ears.

For character actors Einstein brows might be a signature look, and scientists will be welcomed into the TV studio with a grizzly beard, but for the everyday executive, business owner or entrepreneur a neatly trimmed look is the way to go for your next on-camera performance.

Screen Presence hair and makeup stylist Sarah Hyde provided the content for this post

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On-Camera Hair Tips for Men

If you’re bald or have thinning hair you may find pre-shoot preparations a little awkward, even with an on-camera hair professional to help you. Or you may fall into a different group, the man who is very particular about the way his hair is styled and prefers not to have anyone else touch his locks.

Whether you’re sensitive about your hair or not, here are some tips as you prepare for your next on-camera appearance:

  • Having a haircut may be the one thing a man does when he has an appointment with the video camera, but don’t cut your hair the day before a shoot.  It will look more natural if it’s grown out by at least a week.
  • Men who don’t usually wear product will typically want to add a little styling cream to avoid hair standing up on end under the heat of the camera lights; styling product also helps with camera-associated frizz.
  • If you’re bald, you need to be aware that the camera lights will bounce off your head, making it extremely shiny and distracting to viewers.  However, the good news is that there are products out there created specifically for you.
  • For those with thinning hair, shiny spots on the scalp will tend to show through the hair. Again, there are clever ways to camouflage this problem and products designed just for you.

While many of the great film stars have the luxury of great hair — think Cary Grant, James Dean and George Clooney — there’s no reason why you can’t at least be at ease with yours.  Above all else, get comfortable with the idea of using the hair product to fit your needs, so that you’re ready to sit under the heat of the camera lights with confidence, undistracted from your mission to communicate effectively on camera.

Screen Presence hair and makeup stylist Sarah Hyde provided the content for this post.

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If you’re bald or have thinning hair you may find pre-shoot preparations a little awkward, even with an on-camera hair professional to help you. Or you may fall into a different group, the man who is very particular about the way his hair is styled and prefers not to have anyone else touch his locks.

Whether you’re sensitive about your hair or not, here are some tips as you prepare for your next on-camera appearance:

  • Having a haircut may be the one thing a man does when he has an appointment with the video camera, but don’t cut your hair the day before a shoot.  It will look more natural if it’s grown out by at least a week.
  • Men who don’t usually wear product will typically want to add a little styling cream to avoid hair standing up on end under the heat of the camera lights; styling product also helps with camera-associated frizz.
  • If you’re bald, you need to be aware that the camera lights will bounce off your head, making it extremely shiny and distracting to viewers.  However, the good news is that there are products out there created specifically for you.
  • For those with thinning hair, shiny spots on the scalp will tend to show through the hair. Again, there are clever ways to camouflage this problem and products designed just for you.

While many of the great film stars have the luxury of great hair — think Cary Grant, James Dean and George Clooney — there’s no reason why you can’t at least be at ease with yours.  Above all else, get comfortable with the idea of using the hair product to fit your needs, so that you’re ready to sit under the heat of the camera lights with confidence, undistracted from your mission to communicate effectively on camera.

Screen Presence hair and makeup stylist Sarah Hyde provided the content for this post.

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On-Camera Makeup Tips for Men

Men generally prefer no fuss and can feel awkward when it comes to applying anything to their face for a shoot, but we think all men could benefit from a little attention, and some product.

Here’s why:

  • The camera tends to wash out skin tones, so adding a little color helps to create a healthy look.
  • Camera lights reflect on the skin and can make the skin shiny, especially the nose and forehead areas.  Using some anti-shine will eliminate the hot spots.
  • Women tend to look polished when they’re facing an HD camera for their close-up. Men should be no exception.

So, if you’re a man about to face the camera with the luxury of a make-up artist on set (or just a producer with some anti-shine), don’t resist! A little product in the right places will help you look your best and avoid those awkward shiny spots, and your audience will be listening to what you’re saying instead of being distracted by how you look.

Screen Presence Hair and Makeup Stylist Sarah Hyde provided the information for this post.

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Men generally prefer no fuss and can feel awkward when it comes to applying anything to their face for a shoot, but we think all men could benefit from a little attention, and some product.

Here’s why:

  • The camera tends to wash out skin tones, so adding a little color helps to create a healthy look.
  • Camera lights reflect on the skin and can make the skin shiny, especially the nose and forehead areas.  Using some anti-shine will eliminate the hot spots.
  • Women tend to look polished when they’re facing an HD camera for their close-up. Men should be no exception.

So, if you’re a man about to face the camera with the luxury of a make-up artist on set (or just a producer with some anti-shine), don’t resist! A little product in the right places will help you look your best and avoid those awkward shiny spots, and your audience will be listening to what you’re saying instead of being distracted by how you look.

Screen Presence Hair and Makeup Stylist Sarah Hyde provided the information for this post.

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