What’s the Right Image of You?

When you hire a photographer to take a picture of you for your website or your social media profile it’s easy to imagine that you’ll show up looking your best and the photographer will do the rest. That’s one approach, and you may get the result you’re looking for, especially if you’ve chosen a photographer for a specific shooting style.

On the other hand, if you’re going to be working with a photographer who has come recommended but you know little about, figure out what you really like for a self portrait so that you can communicate your preferences in advance.

Take a look at photographs of other people on their company websites or on LinkedIn and consider the following:

  • Do you prefer images that are shot within a professional environment or those taken in nature?
  • Do you respond to naturalistic photographs or do posed images do more for you?
  • Do you like images with blown out or abstract backgrounds, or do sharper backdrops appeal more?
  • Do standing or sitting poses speak to you?

It’s possible to pick and chose. You may be a company owner who prefers a standing, posed image taken on a beach with a soft background. Or you may be an executive who relates to professional looking images taken under studio lights with abstract backgrounds.

Take a look around and observe what you’re drawn to. This will inform the conversation you’ll have with your photographer about the location for the shoot. “People are more particular about what they like and don’t like than they want to believe,” says Screen Presence photographer Stefanie Atkinson.

Screen Presence photographer Stefanie Atkinson provided the content for this post

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When you hire a photographer to take a picture of you for your website or your social media profile it’s easy to imagine that you’ll show up looking your best and the photographer will do the rest. That’s one approach, and you may get the result you’re looking for, especially if you’ve chosen a photographer for a specific shooting style.

On the other hand, if you’re going to be working with a photographer who has come recommended but you know little about, figure out what you really like for a self portrait so that you can communicate your preferences in advance.

Take a look at photographs of other people on their company websites or on LinkedIn and consider the following:

  • Do you prefer images that are shot within a professional environment or those taken in nature?
  • Do you respond to naturalistic photographs or do posed images do more for you?
  • Do you like images with blown out or abstract backgrounds, or do sharper backdrops appeal more?
  • Do standing or sitting poses speak to you?

It’s possible to pick and chose. You may be a company owner who prefers a standing, posed image taken on a beach with a soft background. Or you may be an executive who relates to professional looking images taken under studio lights with abstract backgrounds.

Take a look around and observe what you’re drawn to. This will inform the conversation you’ll have with your photographer about the location for the shoot. “People are more particular about what they like and don’t like than they want to believe,” says Screen Presence photographer Stefanie Atkinson.

Screen Presence photographer Stefanie Atkinson provided the content for this post

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What does your profile pic say about you?

If a professional photographer is responsible for the images of you used on your social media profiles, that was probably a smart move. You’re also in a tiny minority. Most people find a photo taken of them by a friend, family member, or even a smartphone “selfie” shot that they don’t absolutely hate, and use that image.  Others might go for something arty or mysterious, but it may not be eliciting the intended response.

Here are some tips for improving your social media profile images:

  • Don’t use the same image for all your social media profiles.  As we know, the intended purpose for LinkedIn is different than Facebook or Twitter, and your image should reflect this fact.  For example, your LinkedIn photo should look professional. Does it?
  • Review your pic and ask yourself what it says about you. Your image will dictate how people are going to perceive you. If you’re not sure what the image projects, ask a friend for feedback.
  • Change your profile image regularly. If you haven’t changed your profile pic since you first signed up for a service, now might be a good time. Actively updating your images keeps you interesting. On LinkedIn it will also trigger a post saying, “Kate has a new photo” – so it might be worth doing just for the incoming compliments!

Most profile pics could do with some image editing help, such as brightening, cropping and color correcting.  Rules of thumb include being able to see your eyes and avoiding the bobblehead look by including at least your shoulders. So, if you’re not ready for a new image you might start by re-working the one you already have.

Screen Presence photographer Stefanie Atkinson provided the information for this post.

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If a professional photographer is responsible for the images of you used on your social media profiles, that was probably a smart move. You’re also in a tiny minority. Most people find a photo taken of them by a friend, family member, or even a smartphone “selfie” shot that they don’t absolutely hate, and use that image.  Others might go for something arty or mysterious, but it may not be eliciting the intended response.

Here are some tips for improving your social media profile images:

  • Don’t use the same image for all your social media profiles.  As we know, the intended purpose for LinkedIn is different than Facebook or Twitter, and your image should reflect this fact.  For example, your LinkedIn photo should look professional. Does it?
  • Review your pic and ask yourself what it says about you. Your image will dictate how people are going to perceive you. If you’re not sure what the image projects, ask a friend for feedback.
  • Change your profile image regularly. If you haven’t changed your profile pic since you first signed up for a service, now might be a good time. Actively updating your images keeps you interesting. On LinkedIn it will also trigger a post saying, “Kate has a new photo” – so it might be worth doing just for the incoming compliments!

Most profile pics could do with some image editing help, such as brightening, cropping and color correcting.  Rules of thumb include being able to see your eyes and avoiding the bobblehead look by including at least your shoulders. So, if you’re not ready for a new image you might start by re-working the one you already have.

Screen Presence photographer Stefanie Atkinson provided the information for this post.

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