Coaching a Fortune 500 Executive’s Commencement Speech

In April and May, we were on retainer to prepare a CEO for an important milestone — giving his first commencement speech. It’s an honor for anyone to be asked to speak on such an important occasion and it’s out of the ordinary for a technology executive who more typically speaks about company products and strategies.

As we reviewed the executive’s on-camera performances at the start of the project — we could see that he was a passable speaker but he had some habits that kept him from being truly entertaining or inspiring. We set out to achieve three goals:  a) to identify with the audience of graduates; b) to feel ‘within himself’ as he communicated from the heart; c) to create a vision about the world in front of them and the opportunities and challenges they face.

Up first was to develop a script that would connect with his audience of several thousand graduates. As expected, this took several iterations over many weeks. It needed to be personal, which meant we needed to keep digging and prodding. Finally we landed on the themes of  embracing change, taking risks and learning from failure. It’s not easy for a successful executive to speak about their failures, especially when they’ve gone from being a self-made millionaire to being broke, all within 5 years, but as journalists we knew this would connect with his audience, and give him credibility.

Once the script was in good shape we started rehearsals. We first mirrored back what we were hearing — his speech was slow and fairly monotonous. This is always profound work, getting our clients to hear themselves the way we hear them. Once they can hear it, they’re motivated to find a better version of themselves. We also used a technique where we marked up his script, providing direction for emphasizing words, pauses, breaths. He found this very useful and became skilled at hitting his marks.

Finally, as we reached the last week, with graduation day in sight and with the core messaging in place, we took the script to some lighter places. Marilyn is a stand up comedian and she’s worked in Silicon Valley for decades, so that was a useful combination. Not all the jokes made it into the final draft but it helped the executive find his own path to some lighter moments.

As the executive spent time with the script in the final days before delivering the speech, he made it his own. This really helped him gear up for the big day. He had the words, he had the techniques, and he now he’d found the heart of what he wanted to communicate: that success and failure go together, that failure shouldn’t stop you from trying, that taking risks will lead to both success and failure and that we all learn from both.

The audience loved him and he soared in his presentation.  We were thrilled to have helped shape it.

Marilyn Pittman and Marianne Wilman were the coaches on this project

Photo credit: FatimehNadimi

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In April and May, we were on retainer to prepare a CEO for an important milestone — giving his first commencement speech. It’s an honor for anyone to be asked to speak on such an important occasion and it’s out of the ordinary for a technology executive who more typically speaks about company products and strategies.

As we reviewed the executive’s on-camera performances at the start of the project — we could see that he was a passable speaker but he had some habits that kept him from being truly entertaining or inspiring. We set out to achieve three goals:  a) to identify with the audience of graduates; b) to feel ‘within himself’ as he communicated from the heart; c) to create a vision about the world in front of them and the opportunities and challenges they face.

Up first was to develop a script that would connect with his audience of several thousand graduates. As expected, this took several iterations over many weeks. It needed to be personal, which meant we needed to keep digging and prodding. Finally we landed on the themes of  embracing change, taking risks and learning from failure. It’s not easy for a successful executive to speak about their failures, especially when they’ve gone from being a self-made millionaire to being broke, all within 5 years, but as journalists we knew this would connect with his audience, and give him credibility.

Once the script was in good shape we started rehearsals. We first mirrored back what we were hearing — his speech was slow and fairly monotonous. This is always profound work, getting our clients to hear themselves the way we hear them. Once they can hear it, they’re motivated to find a better version of themselves. We also used a technique where we marked up his script, providing direction for emphasizing words, pauses, breaths. He found this very useful and became skilled at hitting his marks.

Finally, as we reached the last week, with graduation day in sight and with the core messaging in place, we took the script to some lighter places. Marilyn is a stand up comedian and she’s worked in Silicon Valley for decades, so that was a useful combination. Not all the jokes made it into the final draft but it helped the executive find his own path to some lighter moments.

As the executive spent time with the script in the final days before delivering the speech, he made it his own. This really helped him gear up for the big day. He had the words, he had the techniques, and he now he’d found the heart of what he wanted to communicate: that success and failure go together, that failure shouldn’t stop you from trying, that taking risks will lead to both success and failure and that we all learn from both.

The audience loved him and he soared in his presentation.  We were thrilled to have helped shape it.

Marilyn Pittman and Marianne Wilman were the coaches on this project

Photo credit: FatimehNadimi

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Client Story: Getting a Handle on the Saboteurs to Get a Promotion

I’m working as a career coach with a young client who is in his first job at a start up. He’s been feeling under-valued and under-appreciated and he’s been working longer and longer days, sometimes putting in as many as 19 hours per day. He’s the strongest individual contributor in his department, always the one management turns to in a crisis.

My client was promised a raise and given a timeline but then his manager left the company. He put his trust in his new manager but was feeling like nothing was happening. He feels competitive with his peers and over time his relationships at work have been taking a hit.

My client’s Saboteurs are very alive. One makes him feel betrayed, another causes him to create trouble by pushing too hard vocally, another makes him passive and unable to follow through.

During coaching we’ve identified and spent time getting to know the Saboteurs — the words they use, when they show up, what gets them going and the impact they have. And we’ve given each Saboteur a name so we now have a shorthand as they show up.

Over the last months my client has been getting more of a handle on his Saboteurs, they’re still present and at times forceful but they’re no longer in the driver’s seat. There’s now more room for his choices, and for smarter and more strategic decisions in the workplace.

During our latest session my client announced that he’d received a hard fought pay rise. He’s also now firmly on a path to a promotion with in-house mentoring and training.

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I’m working as a career coach with a young client who is in his first job at a start up. He’s been feeling under-valued and under-appreciated and he’s been working longer and longer days, sometimes putting in as many as 19 hours per day. He’s the strongest individual contributor in his department, always the one management turns to in a crisis.

My client was promised a raise and given a timeline but then his manager left the company. He put his trust in his new manager but was feeling like nothing was happening. He feels competitive with his peers and over time his relationships at work have been taking a hit.

My client’s Saboteurs are very alive. One makes him feel betrayed, another causes him to create trouble by pushing too hard vocally, another makes him passive and unable to follow through.

During coaching we’ve identified and spent time getting to know the Saboteurs — the words they use, when they show up, what gets them going and the impact they have. And we’ve given each Saboteur a name so we now have a shorthand as they show up.

Over the last months my client has been getting more of a handle on his Saboteurs, they’re still present and at times forceful but they’re no longer in the driver’s seat. There’s now more room for his choices, and for smarter and more strategic decisions in the workplace.

During our latest session my client announced that he’d received a hard fought pay rise. He’s also now firmly on a path to a promotion with in-house mentoring and training.

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